Monday, 9 December 2002

How 'Conspiracy Kooks' Became More Credible Than the White House

Imagine it, codshit.com more credible than bbc.co.uk, I wish!! Anyway, ego aside for a minute, the "mainstream" media shows such a demonstrable lack of credibility I'm not suprised that people are turning to the Internet for news. At least out here in cyberspace you can get the information you need to make your own mind up...

posted by voxfux

"In the next 5 to 10 years, we are all going to live in a global version of Nazi Germany." - David Icke

"Basically, all the conspiracy theories about secret societies wanting to take over the world are wrong." - Daniel Pipes

Anyone who's ever tuned into the History Channel's "Secret Societies" recognizes these quotes from its opening segment. As part of the "History's Mysteries" series, "Secret Societies" is a fun, often sensational journey inside the world of would-be cabals and plots for world domination. Featuring volleyed testimony from various experts, the program mixes factual information and historical trivia with open speculation on the role secret societies may have played in these events. "Do shadowy and clandestine groups really rule the world?" host Arthur Kent campily inquires, before hinting at hidden subtext behind historical moments.

During the 1980 presidential campaign, for example, the History Channel reports that Ronald Reagan repeatedly expressed a distrust of secret societies and promised that Skull and Bonesman, Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) member and Trilateral Commission alumni George Bush would not be offered a position in his administration. Yet during the Republican Convention, Reagan broke tradition by making a late-night dash from his hotel room to the convention floor and declaring George Bush his running mate. The Iran hostage situation was miraculously resolved the day Reagan was sworn in.

Ever since Prescott Bush was penalized for trading with the Nazis during World War II and the words "George Bush of the CIA" surfaced on a 1963 FBI report on the JFK assassination, the Bush family has been tied to speculation. And certainly, October Surprises and Iran/Contra add to the intrigue while links between the Bushes and the Hinkleys and Bushes and bin Ladens have not gone unnoticed. Regardless how entertaining this speculation may be, however, reasonable people have historically heard the word "conspiracy" and rejected theories outright -- even those theories that later proved to be true. And given a choice between the conspiracy theorists and debunkers, they've tended to take the road less kooky.

Full story...

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